Alessandro Alessandroni

Alessandro Alessandroni
Alessandro Alessandroni

For any collector of Italian soundtracks the name of Alessandro Alessandroni is probably a familiar one. He is undoubtedly the one artiste, composer/musician that is involved in almost 99% of all Italian soundtracks, his choir IL CANTORI MODERNI, has vocalised on scores for the Italian cinema that have been penned by the likes of Ennio Morricone, Bruno Nicolai, Carlo Rustichelli, Nico Fidenco, Francesco De Masi, Franco Micalizzi, Stelvio Cipriani, Piero Umiliani and Gianni Ferrio. To name a few, he is also responsible for a handful of scores for Italian productions and has been a featured soloist on many soundtracks. His whistle is distinctive and flawless, and his performances on electric guitar are second too none. It is Ennio Morricone that is the composer Alessandroni worked with most extensively during the mid to late 1960s and throughout the 1970s and 1980s. Alessandroni has recently scored a new Italian produced comedy western entitled TRINITY GOES EAST the score is everything that one would expect from the maestro, Continue reading Alessandro Alessandroni

Who Can Kill a Child?

Who Can Kill a Child?
Who Can Kill a Child?

The score for this 1974 Spanish horror movie is one that was certainly ahead of its time musically, composer Waldo De los Rios fashioned a multi- faceted score which contains many innovative and highly inventive moments. De Los Rios uses children’s voices to create an atmosphere that is wholly chilling in the same way in which Jerry Goldsmith utilized them in POLTERGEIST. Right from the offset the composer sets an uneasy and somewhat ominous and unsettling tone with a solo child’s voice that hums sweetly a simple but unnerving little ditty that has many affiliations with the central theme from Christopher Komeda’s ROSEMARYS BABY score. The cue is short lived but certainly commands ones attention, the lone voice being joined at the tracks conclusion by children laughing which creates an atmosphere that is s nerve-jangling and disconcerting. Continue reading Who Can Kill a Child?

55 Days at Peking

55 Days at Peking
55 Days at Peking

After experiencing the epic movie LAWRENCE OF ARABIA and having my first brush with film music, I was taken to see 55 DAYS AT PEKING. I have to admit I never really noticed the music in this movie – I think I was too busy enjoying all the explosions, the battle scenes, the costumes, the array of uniforms on display and the gripping storyline. I loved the film and a few years later came across the soundtrack LP on CBS Records in a second hand store for the princely sum of 24 shillings and 6 pence, which in today’s currency is about £1.25. Alongside the LP in the rack were THE FALL OF THE ROMAN EMPIRE and EL CID, both at the same price. I looked carefully at all three and decided 55 DAYS had the better cover so I got it (I hasten to add I did return and got the other three with my saved pocket money). What I loved about the old LP record Continue reading 55 Days at Peking

Lucas Vidal

Lucas Vidal
Lucas Vidal

Lucas Vidal is a versatile and expressive composer who recently scored the feature films THE RAVEN with John Cusack and THE COLD LIGHT OF DAY starring Bruce Willis and Sigourney Weaver. A native of Spain, Vidal made history at the Berklee College of Music where he was the youngest student to ever compose and record the score for a feature film with an 80-piece orchestra. He then moved to New York to continue his studies under the guidance of Richard Danielpour while attending the Julliard School of Music. Vidal was exposed to the intricacies of music composition at a very young age, allowing him to develop his distinct style of composition and a unique use of longhand writing skills.

In addition to numerous feature films, his impressive resume includes writing a piece for the opening gala of the Boston Ballet, conducing at the Boston Symphony Hall, commercial advertising and video game soundtracks. He has recorded over 100 sessions in most of the major studios throughout the United States and Europe. Lucas Vidal currently splits his time between Madrid and Los Angeles. Continue reading Lucas Vidal

Dracula A.D. 1972

Dracula A.D. 1972
Dracula A.D. 1972

When this movie first hit the cinemas, it was slated and put down by critics, it was seen as a vehicle for Hammer films to try and become hip with the younger generation, which in fact it was, sadly at the time it failed miserably and was to be honest a laugh a minute, with all its so called trendy and groovy talk from the younger members of the cast, if one had lived during the 1970s one would know this. But it has in recent years become something of a cult film, and on viewing it a couple of times more recently I too have warmed to it, OK its certainly no classic hammer horror but it contains some interesting and suitably horrific moments. The score by Mike Vickers does its job and supports and enhances where it needs to, the former Manfred Mann group member provided the film with a funky sounding pop orientated score Continue reading Dracula A.D. 1972