R-2067256-1262065713

Back in 1991 Full Moon records or Moonstone records as they were called being a division of the Full Moon film company run by Charles Band, were very active in the release of soundtrack compact discs, a number of these were by Richard Band who is a composer I have always admired and one who is noted for creating some magnificent soundtracks on a shoestring budget. There were also a number of scores by other composers released on the label. SUBSPECIES (the night has fangs) was one such score, the music is by a collective of composers Richard Kosinski, Michael Portis, John Zeretzke and Stuart Brotman. This quartet of music-smiths produced a soundtrack that was to say the least original, inventive and interesting and for a horror score it contained its fair share of highly melodic moments. Performed by the Aman Folk orchestra the soundtrack contains a number of unusual instruments and these were bolstered and supported by an array of synthetic sounds. The score also contained choral effects and solo vocals which were stunningly effective. SUBSPECIES tells the story of a long blood feud between two vampire Brothers, one Stefan is trying to overcome his animal lust for blood but the other Radu is intent on perusing his insatiable thirst for blood and also wants more power so that he may rule the vampire world, he can do this only if he posses the bloodstone and to get this he must do battle with his sibling. The storyline to SUBSPECIES is greatly aided by the use of a highly atmospheric score and it is the use of numerous ethnic instruments such as Turkish oboe, duval, fuyara, tilinca, fulier, gardon and an eerie sounding cimbalon that enable the composers to underline, support and enhance the scenarios that are unfolding on screen so effectively and also so authentically. The movie which was the first Horror film to be filmed in Transylvania, boasts a score that utilises sophisticated synthetic sounds which are cleverly and seamlessly interwoven with music that is more traditional to Eastern Europe. The more traditional dramatic horror soundtrack being provided by composers Richard Kosinski and Michael Portis using growling synths and weird short sounds to create a sound-scape that is ominous and fearsome. Synthesised choir too plays an important part within the score, creating an otherworldly atmosphere. The folk and traditional material being written by John Zeretzke and Stuart Brotman. The end product is stunning and wonderfully effective. There is one track that seems to stand out among all of the others this is track number 16, FUNERAL FOR LILLIAN, a lone drum sets down the tempo for the cue, and is relegated to being a background to a female voice which performs a short but memorable lament which is itself unnerving and unearthly. The score intermingles and fuses Bulgarian, Hungarian, Turkish and Romanian musical flavours and successfully merges these with contemporary sounds to create a chilling and unsettling cocktail of music. One to watch out for, worth a listen.

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