PAST LIFE.

 

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The name of composer Cyrille Aufort, has for a few years been popping up here and there, and every time I have experienced his music I have always found it to be rewarding and uplifting. The composers gift for creating melodies and lilting tone poems is quite extraordinary, he has a varied style and approach towards fashioning scores for movies, but in the main takes the classical sounding route as in fully orchestral and symphonic. I would have to say that his style and the sound that he achieves on many of his soundtracks is somewhat similar to Armand Amar, but it is not in any way un-original or mimicking this composers music, Aufort like Amar is in my opinion highly innovative and in many cases employs a brooding or underlying musical persona, which is present throughout or is utilised as a starting point and continues to act as a background or a foundation to the nuances and motifs that the composer creates and basically weaves into it, the effect is at times quite stunning, and on occasion takes one by surprise but it is a nice surprise as more often than not one is not expecting it. I first became acquainted with this style in his score for, L’EMPERUER and again in his work on LA GLACE ET LA CIEL, however, in these two examples the composer did employ a grand sounding thematic content and develop the central themes to a greater level, his music being an essential component of both productions. With L’EMPERUER , being laden with rich themes. Of course, Aufort is more than capable of producing dramatic and even tense and dissonant musical landscapes, and I know that this sounds like a cliché, but the composer is chameleon like when producing music for movies, take SPLICE for example, which was quite a dark work, matching the subject matter. One of his latest soundtracks is for PAST LIFE, this is a perfect example of the versatility and originality of this composer, the score is for most of its duration, somewhat light and melodic, but these melodic passages are not in any way overblown or even grand sounding, in fact they are more like hints of melodies, or small wisps of themes that do not fully develop but still manage to become familiar with the listener. The composer relies predominantly upon, low key strings and woods with fragile sounding piano, harp and female voice to purvey an atmosphere and mood that is emotive, poignant and hauntingly beautiful. The opening theme is a tender and subtle piece with piano delicately performing the opening bars, supported by strings, with a light and melancholy sounding horn, strings develop and swell as the piano expands upon the opening phrases. Track number three, KATOWISE, is slightly more up-tempo, with driving strings of sorts, laying down a foundation for the composer to build on, employing woods and more strings which at times begin to take on a more sinister persona. The composers low-key approach on this score has certainly paid dividends as he has fashioned a work that is not only alluring, but is one that I am sure listeners will return to on many occasions.

 

There are also a handful of cues performed by THE THLEMA YELLIN ALUMNI CHOIR, which are also compelling pieces and are also an important component of the films storyline which is set in 1977. It begins with an Israeli choir performing in Berlin, and we see an older woman looking through the program for the concert, she is drawn to the name of a young woman who is performing solo soprano, and is familiar with it. Later at a gathering after the performance, the older woman in the audience Agnieszka played by Katarzyna Gniewkowska decides that She must speak with the Soprano singer, who’s, name is Sephi and portrayed by actress Joy Rieger. The conversation that entails is a difficult and tense encounter as Sephi speaks no German and the Older woman speaks no Hebrew, but Agnieszka still manages to get over to Sephi that she knew her Father and that he was a murderer. What follows is a storyline that is like a thread being unraveled as Sephi, confides in her sister and together they discover that maybe their Father is not the man they know and love. A tangled web of deceit, dark secrets and heartache unfolds, all of which is matched and punctuated wonderfully by Aufort’s score. The work also contains additional music by, Avner Dorman and Ella Milch-Sheriff.  Recommended.

TRACK LISTING
1 Past Life Theme 2:51
2 Hishki Hizki (composed by Abraham Caseres) 3:33
3 Katowice 1:37
4 Baruch’s Diary Part 1 2:58
5 Photoshoot 2:18
6 Dance Teacher 1:31
7 Warsaw 3:19
8 The Concert (composed by Avner Dorman) 3:07
9 Baruch’s Diary Part 2 2:05
10 Archives 4:35
11 Zielinski 2:31
12 Sefi’s Letter 1:48
13 Berlin 2:43
14 The Time Will Come (composed by Ella Milch-Sheriff) 3:56
15 Baruch and Agnieszka 2:03
16 Past Life End Credits 2:50
17 Cantique de Jean Racine (composed by Gabriel Fauré) 5:29

 

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WILD GEESE 2.

 

At last WILD GEESE 2, has been issued on to compact disc, not only is this a fantastic action score, but it is issued on a label that I have much admiration for, CALDERA. It is presented so well with in depth notes courtesy of the informed writer Gergely Hubai, art work by Luis Miguel Rojas and some great pics to, it also includes pictures of excerpts from the handwritten score and a detailed biography of the composer, the CD has a lovely audio clip with Sylvia Budd talking as-well, plus a nice picture of the composer on the front cover sitting at the piano as always smiling in a way that only he could. The productions values on the release are amazing, the sound is so clear and full, so crisp and fresh, another big pat on the back for CALDERA and another thank you for bringing us this wonderful score. WILD GEESE 2 was a sequel of sorts to WILD GEESE which had been released in 1978. The original movie which starred Richard Burton and Richard Harris along with Roger Moore and a cast of familiar actors also giving support was a success at cinemas so the second movie was planned and was written with actor Burton returning as the Faulkner character he had portrayed in the previous picture, but sadly he passed away before filming started and sections of the screenplay had to be re-written.

 

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Poster when Richard Burton was destined to star in the film.

 

Directed by Peter Hunt, the storyline of the movie focuses upon and around top-level Nazi Rudolph Hess portrayed by Laurence Olivier who has important information on prominent political figures. Ruthless TV executives Michael and Kathy Lukas played by John Terry and Barbara Carrera, want to get him out of his prison cell to appear on a live television broadcast. Faulkner played by Edward Fox declines their offer to lead a mission to break Hess free, but recommends Lebanese/American turned mercenary Haddad (Scott Glenn) as a substitute who takes on the mission, which very quickly turns into a nightmare for everyone involved. The film also featured performances by Stratford Johns, Ingrid Pitt and Patrick Stewart

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As soon as the opening track on the soundtrack begins it is so obvious that this is the music of Roy Budd, his unmistakable rousing style for pictures such as this shining through straight away, and establishing immediately a tense but stalwart sounding atmosphere. The composer even includes a little snippet of the original WILD GEESE theme, to further grab our attention, and although this is just literally a micro second it is instantly recognisable. WILD GEESE 2, is in my opinion one of the composers most accomplished action scores, it is brimming with highly dramatic music and has about it a rousing and patriotic sound which every so often raises its head. There is an anthem like central theme that is the foundation on which the composer builds the remainder of the score, it is a relentless and full on work that is performed magnificently by The London Symphony orchestra, conducted by Roy.

 

WILD GEESE, was and still is a Roy Budd signature work, along with other scores such as SOLDIER BLUE and GET CARTER, simply because it is a score that has so many themes and brilliantly fashioned musical passages, WILD GEESE 2, is more of a contemporary sounding work which not only is memorable for its use of tense and exciting cues, but also for its more up-beat and funky sounding tracks that are cleverly woven into the fabric of the fully orchestral score.

I think if I was asked to describe the sound achieved by the composer on WILD GEESE 2, I would probably liken it to his score for WILD GEESE plus it has attributes and quirks of orchestration that can be heard within WHO DARES WINS or THE FINAL OPTION as it was entitled in certain territories. Plus, there are nods of acknowledgement to composers such as John Barry, Jerry Goldsmith and Jerry Fielding, who Roy admired and respected. With that funky sound the composer employed in some of his other film scores, such as FOXBAT, THE CAREY TREATMENT etc, becoming a driving force within the work. The composer keeps up the musical momentum throughout never taking his eye off the ball and creates a score that is just exhilaratingly uplifting and enthralling. The composers use of a funky but apprehensive sound is more evident in track number 4, MOVING ROUND SPANDAU, which has a somewhat easy-going background to begin with, performed on percussion with electric bass punctuating proceedings, this soon develops into something much grander and continues to build and gain momentum, with some truly wonderful brass flourishes acting as musical stabs or mini fanfares of sorts giving the cue greater effect both within the movie and away from it.

 

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Like all Roy Budd soundtracks WILD GEESE 2, has a life of its own away from the images it was intended to enhance, and I must say it is a truly invigorating and rewarding listen. This is a score that is grandiose in the main, but also has some beautifully written quieter moments as in track number, 6, THE ROMANCE BEGINS, which is a delightfully haunting piece that begins with solo piano, which I am guessing must be Roy, this is then joined by light and airy strings which take on the 7, note melody that was initiated by the piano.

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Budd was a gifted pianist as well as a composer as we all are aware, and he was a master at creating what some would call sugary sounding love themes, but I like to refer to these as melodic and memorable tone poems. There is also a vocal version of this cue which Caldera have included at the end of the album, performed by German singer Peter Hoffman, it is too an enjoyable listen. The soundtrack was originally released on a CBS long playing record back in 1985 (CBS 26462), and CALDERA RECORDS compact disc release is the same track line up. The reason for this being that CALDERA wanted to use the composers own master tapes but sadly these had been damaged in a flood and were un-useable, so they contacted Sony music to see if they had any tapes available of the score, fortunately they did but only the LP masters, so it means that the complete score won’t be issued, unless of course someone has copies of the masters safe and sound somewhere, so this means that the music released both on the LP and now the CD is approximately 10 minutes short of being the complete score, but with music of this high quality I am sure we as collectors will not mind at all, as any Roy Budd release is always welcome.

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WILD GEESE 2, is probably one of the composers most infectious soundtracks from the 1980, s, as I for one have not stopped listening to it, and every time I take a listen I find more and more inventive writing, more original musicality and even more ingenious orchestration and arranging skills plus a masterful use of a handful of synthetic instrumentation that is skilfully fused with the conventional line up of the LSO. I don’t think any other composer at the time or indeed in recent years has been able to fuse so many styles and sounds together as Roy Budd has and make them work so well. It has a sumptuous and opulent sound to it, as well as a dramatic and intense style, it is filled with musical colours and textures that evoke memories of an age that is long gone within the area of scoring films, it has wonderful themes, it has emotion and it has that funky groove which keeps things moving along at pace and it has the unmistakable musical fingerprint of Roy Budd all over it. This is CALDERA RECORDS 22nd release, and is an important one because it fills a gap within Roy Budd’s discography, and is a fitting tribute to this kind, friendly man who just happened to be able to write some of the best film music ever. One to add to your collection ASAP.

 

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1. Main Title (4:35)
2. Cat and Mouse in Berlin (3:35)
3. Solitary Confinement (3:46)
4. Moving Around Spandau (3:16)
5. The Wall (1:50)
6. The Romance Begins (2:36)
7. Plot and Deceit (2:22)
8. Attempt to Free Hess (8:31)
9. Escape (1:37)
10. End Titles (2:46)
11. Say You’ll Be Mine (4:45)
Performed by Peter Hoffmann
Bonus:
12. Audio Commentary by Sylvia Budd

FIELD OF HONOUR.

 

 

A somewhat neglected example of the music of Roy Budd in a war movie is FIELD OF HONOUR, the movie which was set in the dark days of the Korean war was released in 1987. The film enjoyed mild success in Europe mainly, but the musical score penned by Roy Budd is one of the movies more prominent and ingratiating attributes. Budd employed an oriental sound throughout the soundtrack and combined this with a more western sounding grandiose and dramatic style, the composer enlisting brass, strings and percussion to underline and support many of the action scenes, but then utilising plaintiff woods and rich and full strings in a highly melodic fashion to depict the Eastern aspects of the movies storyline. Like Jerry Goldsmith, Budd seemed to be at home writing this style of Oriental music, and the themes that he fashioned for this movie are indeed haunting and beguilingly magical. The score is one of the composers least mentioned works, and I think I am right when I say that not that many collectors were aware of its existence. The compact disc was released on SILVA SCREEN records (SIL1502-2), and is paired with the music from THE SECRET OF THE ICE CAVE by Robert M.Esty ll. But it is FIELD OF HOUNOUR that I will review and bring to your attention, as it is the more prominent and dare I say important work on the disc. The MAIN TITLES, open with a quite pretty wood wind motif, that is supported by Chinese harp and these two instruments supported by martial sounding timpani, soon establish themselves and the theme for the movie, the composer continues to employ the theme but adds to it more percussive elements that are in no way harsh or overbearing, instead these act as a background to some beautiful strings, that in turn are augmented and given depth by the introduction of brass and continued percussive support. Track 2, HOLE IN YOUR HEAD, is a typical Roy Budd action cue, with horns heralding the opening and kind of calling the percussion and brass to join them, dark sounding piano is also brought into the equation, again given support and elevated by the use of thundering percussion, and Chinese sounding instrumentation that punctuates the proceedings, the track is a sort of stop start action piece, by this I mean it erupts into rhythmic upbeat action mode from time to time, but also melts into a more romantic and calming mood, with the composer introducing his central theme in the lulls of the cue. To say that FIELD OF HONOUR is a good score, is certainly an understatement, it is a great score, but it is sadly one that is often forgotten, probably because the film was not a massive box office success. It is also a score that echoes many of the works of Jerry Goldsmith, it has pace, depth and solid thematic properties which even in the fast-paced action cues, manage to shine through. Roy Budd never wrote a bad score in my opinion and much of his film music is remembered where, as many of the films it was written for are long lost in the mists of time. Another Roy Budd to look out for, highly recommended.

1.
Main Titles (03:29)
2.
Hole in Your Head (04:04)
3.
Have a Look (02:07)
4.
Rats/Moonlight/Attack From Behind (03:27)
5.
On His Way (02:08)
6.
Chinese Attack (02:27)
7.
Rape Death (02:04)
8.
Sire Scouts Chinese (02:36)
9.
War Outside/Dynamite Raid (03:48)
10.
End Titles (03:13)

 

ROY BUDD’S MASTERPIECE, THE PHANTOM OF THE OPERA.

 

 

 

When you think about it the music of composer Roy Budd was a very big part of going to the cinema during the 1970, s, and on and into the late 1980, s. He scored some of the most popular movies that were produced during this period, and it all started with SOLDIER BLUE, which very soon became a movie with a reputation, probably for all the wrong reasons, but nevertheless Roy’s music was a key feature of that movie, he followed the success of SOLDIER BLUE with numerous soundtracks for a varied collection of films and was also responsible for creating catchy themes for TV shows such as THE SANDBAGGERS and MR ROSE. He was responsible for the stirring themes for THE WILD GEESE and also THE SEA WOLVES, fashioned another great western score in the form of his music for CATLOW, and treated audiences to some atmospheric music for so many other pictures, THE BLACK WINDMILL, THE STONE KILLER, TOMORROW NEVER COMES, THE FLIGHT OF THE DOVES, GET CARTER, ZEPPLIN, DIAMONDS, KIDNAPPED, SOMETHING TO HIDE, THE MARSEILLE CONTRACT, FEAR IS THE KEY, WHO DARES WINS,WILD GEESE 2, SINBAD AND THE EYE OF THE TIGER,THE MAGNIFICENT SEVEN DEADLY SINS, MAMA DRACULA, FIELD OF HONOUR etc, in fact the list is indeed endless.

 

One of his best loved scores is for PAPER TIGER, which starred David Niven. The music for this is so varied and haunting, and included a hit song, WHO KNOWS THE ANSWERS, which was performed by THE MIKE SAMMES SINGERS, and had lyrics by Sammy Cahn, the score also featured performances from THE RAY CONNIFF SINGERS and for me was a fusion of the styles of Goldsmith and Mancini, being highly dramatic and stirring, but at the same time having at its core a fully romantic sounding theme, which were given the Budd treatment. Its highly emotive themes and surging strings, evoking all the splendour and magnificence of those great film themes of the past.

 

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On Sunday October 8th, there is a very special performance of Roy’s magnificent score for the 1925, silent movie THE PHANTOM OF THE OPERA, which starred Lon Chaney, Roy worked tirelessly to fashion the score for this movie, and put all that he possibly could into its creation. Sadly, it was his dedication to this project, and his quest for musical perfection that ultimately cost him his life. PHANTOM the score, is a standing testimony to the genius and artistry of this wonderful composer and generously kind man, who was taken from us far too soon. Nick Hocart is one of the dedicated people behind bringing the concert or performance to fruition, I asked him a few questions about it and his thoughts about the music of Roy Budd.

Have you always been a fan of Roy Budd and how did you become involved with the live performance of Roy Budd’s THE PHANTOM OF THE OPERA?

Unfortunately, Roy passed away when I was too young to have seen any of the films he scored, and I was unaware of his talent. I studied music at school and left Australia seeking a career in the industry. Four years ago, I was introduced to Sylvia Budd, who told me all about Roy’s career, his phantom of the opera score and his commission to write his first opera for the Berlin Opera. I was shocked that such a brilliant composer and accomplished musician was not more widely held up as an influence and role model in the British music scene, and more so that his masterpiece score had never been publicly performed. Having heard the score Roy wrote to Phantom I agreed to help Sylvia make the live performance happen – it’s going to be incredible to hear this music performed live.

What size orchestra will be performing on the night, and was it an easy task getting an orchestra involved in the project and a conductor?

 

We have a 77, piece orchestra, the Docklands Sinfonia performing the score for the premiere in the London Coliseum. The score was written for an 84, piece orchestra, it’s an incredibly full and rich piece of music, but the challenge is space for all the musicians! We may yet have to reduce the orchestra by a couple of strings to fit all the percussion in the pit too, but however many musicians we can fit in, we will!
The conductor and founder of the orchestra, Spencer Down, has been hugely excited to make this happen from the outset, and his involvement has been crucial to getting to where we are today.

1925-the-phantom-of-the-opera

 

 

If the performance on October 8th is successful, do you think that maybe there could be other dates arranged at other venues?

 

We do have interest to do more shows in other parts of the world, and we would hope further interest to do more shows in the UK too. There are people waiting for this opportunity to hear the music first hand, to see if Roy was successful in making the transition from jazz to classical maestro. I hope they won’t be disappointed.

Would a concert of the music of Roy Budd be something that you or his estate would consider, I am sure that there are so many fans old and new out there that would love to hear his music performed live?

 

This is a tougher one – while I don’t have the full history I understand that Roy parted ways with his former agent, there were issues, and some of the music remains outside the control of Roy’s estate. Hypothetically – it would be great to put together some of Roy’s classic scores for a grand performance.

Roy Conducting

I know when I interviewed Roy just before he died he was so passionate and excited about the score he had written for PHANTOM, why did it take so long for the music to be released onto a recording?

 

When you meet Sylvia, you understand that she is still very much in love with Roy and his passing must have been devastating to her. There were also issues to sort out as well as illness over the years – but what matters is it is available for fans now as well as the opportunity to hear the performance live!

 

What for you is the appeal of Roy Budd’s music?

Firstly, I couldn’t believe the score to Phantom the first time I heard it – it really takes the film to a new level – you need to see the film with the score to realise the effect it has. After that introduction to his music I went back through his jazz works and he has fantastic speed and timing, and is clearly a perfectionist – never a note or beat that doesn’t sound exactly like it should be where he’s playing it. Listen to a song like I’ll remember April and it sounds like a classic jazz standard, except it’s got his stamp of originality on it, his sound, little runs on the piano that sound deceivingly simple. Also watch any video of Roy performing – he’s clearly having a great time performing and leading his musicians who are all watching him closely for cues and following his lead. Amazing musician, performer, composer!

 

Soldier Blue was Roy’s first major film score, a great soundtrack, but unfortunately the actual score, remains un-released, there is so much music in the movie, I hope one day to see this released, do you think it will ever happen?

 

I need to refer to my earlier answer on his older work here – I don’t know the history or where the rights may be at this point in time. All my efforts to date have been to bring about the performance of Phantom. Who knows what a successful performance may bring about…

 

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My thanks to Nick for taking the time to answer my questions and for his dedication to the memory and the music of Roy Budd. I truly hope that the live performance of THE PHANTOM OF THE OPERA score by Roy Budd, will be a great success, please if you can support this event. See you there……..

BEN – HUR.

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Question, how do you review a film score that is already a classic, already evergreen and already loved by many? Well that’s a difficult question, unless of course you happen to have a copy of the new re-recording of BEN HUR by Tadlow music. BEN HUR the music has played a big part in my life, it was along with EL CID. LAWRENCE OF ARABIA and ZULU among the first ten or twenty soundtrack LPs that I had in my collection, it was also a film that I loved and a book that I read over and over as a child. In later years too, the music played a big part as I used it in a school nativity which was staged at the local Church, where my youngest son played the angel Gabriel and did his lines to a soundtrack of the MOTHERS LOVE music. This superbly wonderful music has endured the years and has maintained its standing as a firm film music great with fans of movie scores and lovers of music alike. This is a score that dreams are made of, filled with melody, themes, glorious pomp and highly emotive musical nuances. The new recording from TADLOW is itself a triumph and a stirring piece of musical history. So, should I try and review it or should I simply just listen to it, well I suppose I will do both. At the fans of music from the movies gathering on September 9th, 2017, James Fitzpatrick of Tadlow, was kind enough to show the gathered audience a film of the recording, the cue which he played to us was ENTR’ACTE the original version, which I think I can say blew everyone away.

 

 

The quality of the recording, the high standard of the performance and the impeccable reconstruction work all made this one of the highlights of the day. Listening to this track again on the recording through my hi fi system just confirmed that this is a thing of beauty and quality. Right from the proud opening brass flourishes it is a piece of music that one straight away associates with Dr Rozsa and with BEN HUR, this is the sound of the Biblical epic, the sound of Hollywood and the sound of the Golden age of film scores. Emotive and poignant, dramatic and rousing, epic and grand, fragile and intimate, it has all of these attributes, and more. To examine the tracks and analyse each of them would I feel be wrong, as my opinion of the score is very, very biased, maybe all I will say is you really need to get this release when it is available, if you do not add this to your collection, then you and that collection will be poorer for it. So, order it now. Have you done it yet, available for pre-order now from Tadlow, released on October 3rd.

 

 

The release contains 157 minutes of music some of which has not been heard before, performed by the excellent CITY OF PRAGUE PHILHARMONIC and CHORUS conducted by Maestro, Nic Raine. This 2-compact disc set, comes with a full colour 16, page booklet. With highly informative notes by Frank K DeWald. New Score & Orchestration Reconstructed by Rozsa Expert Leigh Phillips.
What! Have you not ordered it yet??????

 

 

http://www.tadlowmusic.com/2017/08/ben-hur-miklos-rozsa/

 

1. OVERTURE (6:17)
2. ANNO DOMINI / STAR OF BETHLEHEM / ADORATION OF THE MAGI (5:09)
3. FANFARE & PRELUDE / MARCIA ROMANA / SPIRIT & SWORD (5:04)
4. SALUTE FOR MESSALA / FRIENDSHIP / FRIENDSHIP CONTINUED (5:00)
5. THE HOUSE OF HUR (2:24)
6. CONFLICT (1:54)
7. ESTHER / THE UNKNOWN FUTURE* (4:24)
8. LOVE THEME / RING FOR FREEDOM (5:27)
9. SALUTE FOR GRATUS / GRATUS’ ENTRY TO JERUSALEM (4:25)
10. ARREST* (1:28)
11. REMINISCENCES (2:05)
12. CONDEMNED* / ESCAPE* / VENGEANCE (3:41)
13. THE PRISON – PART 1 / BEHIND GRILLS** / THE PRISON – PART 2 / SILENT FAREWELL** (2:23)
14. THE DESERT / EXHAUSTION / THE PRINCE OF PEACE / ROMAN GALLEY (7:36)
15. SALUTE FOR ARRIUS / QUINTUS ARRIUS / THE ROMAN FLEET (2:28)
16. THE GALLEY (THE ROWING OF THE GALLEY SLAVES) / REST (4:30)
17. BATTLE PREPARATIONS / THE PIRATE FLEET / ATTACK! / RAMMING SPEED / BATTLE / RESCUE / ROMAN SAILS / THE ROWERS (11:05)
18. VICTORY PARADE / VICTORY FINALE (2:48)
TT: 78:16
CD 2:
1. FERTILITY DANCE (1:57)
2. ARRIUS’ PARTY (1:21)
3. NOSTALGIA / FAREWELL TO ROME (2:26)
4. JUDEA / A BARREN COAST* (3:51)
5. BALTHAZAR / BALTHAZAR’S WORLD (3:51)
6. HARUN AL ROZSAD* (2:19)
7. HOMECOMING / MEMORIES / HATRED (5:23)
8. THE DUNGEON** / LEPERS (3:22)
9. RETURN / PROMISE / SORROW / INTERMISSION (7:34)
10. ENTR’ACTE (Original Version) (3:34)
11. PANEM ET CIRCENSES (1:10)
12. CIRCUS FANFARES (0:43)
13. FANFARE FOR CIRCUS PARADE / CIRCUS PARADE (PARADE OF THE CHARIOTEERS) (3:33)
14. BEN-HUR CROWNED / BITTER TRIUMPH / AFTERMATH (2:55)
15. VALLEY OF LEPERS / THE SEARCH / THE UNCLEANS (5:42)
16. ROAD OF SORROW / THE MOUNT / THE SERMON / FRUSTRATION (5:28)
17. VALLEY OF THE DEAD / TIRZAH SAVED (4:12)
18. THE PROCESSION TO CALVARY / THE BEARING OF THE CROSS / RECOGNITON (7:56)
19. GOLGOTHA / CALVARY** / AFTERTHOUGHTS** / SHADOW OF STORM (2:35)
20. THE MIRACLE / FINALE (5:27)
21. LOVE THEME FROM BEN-HUR (3:00)
TT: 78:33
*Not in film
**Premiere recording

 

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