Tag Archives: kronos records.

MORTE VESTITA DI DOLLAR. (AKA-DOG EAT DOG/WHEN STRANGERS MEET).

KG27

http://kronosrecords.com/KG27.html

Available Now, from Kronos records.

Kronos

Directed by no less than four film makers, Richard E. Cunha, Gustav Gavrin, Ray Nazzaro and Albert Zugsmith, the movie is an entertaining production and does I have to say sustain an air of drama and tension, but also has an equal amount of lighter moments along the way. Released in the UK as WHEN STRANGERS MEET which was the title of the original novel by Robert Bloomfield on which the films screenplay was based, the movie had the title DOG EAT DOG in the USA and MORTE VESTITA DI DOLLAR in Italy. The score composed and conducted by Carlo Savina is a work that includes several musical styles all of which are rich in melody and filled with drama and vitality. The score is a vibrant and energetic one, the composer combining the big band jazz sound with that of a more luxurious and stylish aura that is linked with many movies that were produced during the 1960, s. For much of its duration the soundtrack leans towards a more traditional jazz style, which is in keeping with the films storyline and the period in which it is set. He composer utilizing to great effect piano, woodwind and at times lush string interludes that are quite grandiose and opulent sounding.

hqdefault
The Maestro also employs a style and sound that is very much akin to the composing style of fellow Italian composers such as Piero Umiliani, Armando Trovaioli and Gianni Ferrio to identify a few. Savina makes effective use of organ solos and introduces and integrates these performances at key points within the work, the sound and style lending much support and atmosphere to the score as well as enhancement to the scenarios unfolding on screen. The use of organ was commonplace in so many Italian soundtracks, the instrumentation adding touches of drama, melancholy and fleeting hints of the sinister, when employed. The opening cue sets the scene perfectly for what we are about to hear, it is a fast-paced swing composition for percussion and brass and although short lived makes an impact immediately. Track two, is a more elaborated version of the opening cue and contains nice muted trumpet performances as well brushed drums and classy sounding piano. Track number three, is more dramatic in its sound and style, the composer employing strings that are supported by both percussive elements and brass, that when combined create a tense and urgent sound. Other cues as CONCERTO ROMANTICO, are quite powerful and emotive, the composer employing solo piano underlined by the string section, which add a certain classical sounding persona to the score. Whereas tracks such as RITMI DI LATTA are pure jazz/swing with vibes and saxophone combining with guitar, piano, percussion, bongos, and bass to purvey a groovy sounding piece, that has an infectious pace and appeal. When listening to this and other scores by the Maestro, it becomes very clear why he was in such demand and how versatile and talented he was.

TRACK LISTING.
1.  Swing Frenetico
   2.  Stasi
3.  Concerto Romantico
4.  Ritmi Di Latta
5.  Atmosfera Torbida
6.  Suona Un Organo
7.  Morte Di Un Ladro
8.  Il Dramma
9.  Caccia Spietata
10.  Grottesco
11.  Delitto
12.  Incerto Candore
13.  Agguato ed Assassinio
14.  Atmosfera Sospesa
15.  In Giallo
16.  Ritratto Di Signora
17.  Sospensione

tracks   1-17 The Original LP Program

tracks 18-36 are previously unreleased bonus tracks, available for the first time ever!

 

Advertisements

249. La noche en que una becaria encontró a Emiliano Revilla.

released soon on KRONOS RECORDS.

 

Thanks once again to Kronos records we can savour and enjoy a film score that ordinarily might have been overlooked and not released on any form of a recording. The music from 249. La noche en que una becaria encontró a Emiliano Revilla, is courtesy of Spanish born composer, Jose Sanchez Sanz, who I do not think will be that familiar to many collectors of music from movies, but, he is a composer who has already a number of film scores to his credit. The score for this documentary is a varied one, the composer successfully fusing both the conventional instrumentation of the orchestra with that of the synthetic and electronic aids that are utilised nowadays by composers and musicians. These two mediums however never clash or overpower each other, the composer has combined them in such a way that they complement, enhance and most importantly support each other and together create a work that is not only innovative and compelling but also a work that is entertaining. Strings and piano are merged with various percussive elements and a subtle scattering of woodwind, these elements jointly purvey superbly a sound and style that is tense, fearfully hesitant and dramatic, although saying this the score also has a slightly less serious side with glimmers of melancholy and nuances of warmth shining through. I suppose one could say this is a brooding soundtrack and a slow burning score, as it has three musical personas, the sad and slightly romantic face being underlined by a richly dark and unsettling side that itself is given more power and credence by the composers fertile and imaginative orchestration skills, that make the work sound larger than it is. Then we have the delicate and fragile character of the work which percolates through the shadowy and nervous material, the composer at one point adding a fleeting and ever so subtle accordion sound that is not that pronounced or prominent but still gives the work that something more, making the listener take even more interest in what is building musically. At times, I was reminded of the Morricone, Nicolai or Cipriani of the 1960, s, mainly because of the use of a somewhat ominous sounding piano which was embroidered by woodwind and strings, although together they create a tense and at times uneasy mood they still manage to be melodic in a strangely attractive and charming way, there were also occasions when I was reminded of other composers such as Dave Grusin, which cannot be a negative thing. The composer builds layers of music and as the work progresses adds various colours and musical notions at key points, these generate a delicious and riveting collection of themes and sub themes, that become almost addictive as the work grows. This is a score that initially sounds European, which given the composers origins is a somewhat accepted conclusion, but then we have another sound or style that begins to filter through and intertwine with the already established Euro sound, this gains momentum as the score develops and has affiliations to the Hollywood thriller score of both today and yesterday.

 

 

 

It is a soundtrack that figuratively oozes sophistication and quality, a work that is innovative, lingering and exciting, but moreover one that is entertaining and rewarding. I am sure that once heard it will also be a work that will convince collectors and connoisseurs of film music that this is a composer who’s name we should be aware of as a talent within the genre of movie scoring and also should look forward to more of his music being released. Jose Sanchez Sanz was born on July 4th,1970 in Madrid Spain. He is known for his work on the movies, I,LL SEE YOU IN MY DREAMS (2003), H6 DIARIO DE UN ASESINO (2005) and THE SYMMETRY OF LOVE from 2010 which contained a jazz influenced soundtrack that was haunting and appealing. As well as scoring feature films the composer has also worked on a number of shorts, television projects and game scores, his first scoring assignment being in 1993 when he worked on EL PRIMERIZO for directors, Francisco de Lucas and David Serrano. His first feature assignment came in 1996 when he wrote the score for MENOS QUE CERO, more short film assignments followed in that year and he scored his second feature a drama entitled BESOS Y ABRAZOS in 1997. The composer has worked steadily since his career in film/TV and media music began and has been involved with over 60 projects to date, his most recent being the short film, VELATORIO (BARROCO) for director Aitor De Miguel in 2016. The composers style is not a uniformed one, in fact his musical style seems to alter each time and he is able to adapt to each project he works on and is successful in fashioning a unique and singular musical voice for every storyline and scenario. I know it is a term quite freely utilised these days, but Jose Sanchez Sanz is quite literally chameleon-like in his approach to writing for film and creates music that enhances and embellishes, giving support and depth to certain characters and underlining situations that are unfolding on the screen. He does this without being intrusive or overbearing, which is as we all know the way in which good film music should work, I am also pleased to say that he also invents some great melodies along the way. The film 249. La noche en que una becaria encontró a Emiliano Revilla, tells the story of the night that the entrepreneur reappeared after being kidnapped by ETA. Told in documentary form with a duration of 77 minutes, it is an interesting and at times a thought provoking piece of cinema, directed by Luis Maria Ferrandez.

IL GIOVANE GARIBALDI.

kg24

 

Maestro Carlo Rustichelli was without a doubt one of Italy’s most prominent composers of film music. He not only scored Italian made movies but was also sought out by film makers outside off the realms of Cinecitta to work on their movies, he worked on a number of Hollywood productions and on every occasion rose to the challenge not only supporting the drama and action on screen but also infusing the motion picture in question with a sound and style that was unmistakably Italian. His use of the more traditional sounding Italian flavoured compositions being a huge hit with cinema audiences all over the world. Rustichelli was for sake of a better description an old school composer who began his career in film scoring at around about the same time as Angelo Francesco Lavagnino, Mario Nascimbene and Nino Rota and like Nascimbene he became a  much in demand composer by non Italian filmmakers to score their movies. He worked on Tragedies, Sword and Sandal Epics, Comedies, Romances, Horror, Police Thrillers, Tales of Adventure and mystery plus he was also very active scoring Italian made westerns.  The composers take on western scoring was slightly different from the sound that was being achieved and  utilised during the period of the 1960,s through to the 1980,s by other composers when the cruelly nicknamed SPAGHETTI WESTERN was at the height of its popularity and that is why his music not only stands out but has also become memorable and enduring. Rustichelli often adopted a more classical or operatic approach when writing for the western and created a sound that was probably more akin to the traditional sound of the Hollywood sagebrush saga as in the romantic and sweeping the composer often combining the grandiose sound of symphonic with a scattering of more upbeat styles and sounds, introducing choir, organ, electric and bass guitar to the equation if and when required giving his scores a more upbeat and contemporary style. Rustichelli was also known for including a circus or comedic sound to his western scores as in BOOT HILL or within the fabric of his music for the excellent REVENGE AT EL PASO. The majority of his western scores contained a strong epic style as in his soundtracks for RIDERS OF VENGEANCE (also available on Kronos records) and BLOOD RIVER which he penned under the alias of Angel Oliver Pino. Rustichelli also provided a strong and deeply emotional sounding score for MAN, PRIDE AND VENGEANCE which although not a western has up until recently been categorised as one by collectors and critics alike. But it is probably the composers non western music that he is best remembered for such as his infectious music for movies such as AVANTI, DIVORCE ITALIAN STYLE, SEDUCED AND ABANDONED, ALFREDO ALFREDO, KAPO, SIGNORE E SIGNORI and many more.

 

saggaribaldi

Rustichelli’s music contained a lush and lavish sound that was not only full of drama but filled to overflowing with passion and a high level of romanticism and melody, his sweeping themes  being the mainstay of his film music work. In many ways his music was more akin to the music of the golden age composers of Hollywood, rich in thematic material and bursting with opulent and lavish leitmotivs. Rustichelli was born in Capri (Modena) on Christmas eve 1916, he studied music in Bologna, where he gained his diploma in pianoforte and then continued to study in Rome where he graduated in composition. He began to write for film in 1942 and soon established himself as a composer of note that possessed a true talent with a gift for melody and originality. He composed the music for IL GIOVANE GARIBALDI   which was an Italian movie made for television that was aired in two episodes in 1974. Directed by Franco Rossi the mini series starred Maurizio Merli in the title role and Philippe Leroy who were supported well by good performances from Luigi Pistilli and Giulio Brogi.  Selections of Rustichelli,s score were released on a stereo C.A.M. long playing record in April 1974 (SAG 9058) but these 14 selections had a short running time which added up to just over 30 minutes. KRONOS RECORDS have for this release assembled a fuller and more expansive representation of this magnificent soundtrack allowing us to experience for the first time the full effect of the Maestros score. The film or series itself is sadly overlooked and also grossly underrated and at last this release will act as a fitting tribute to the wonderfully haunting music that Carlo Rustichelli penned to enhance and support it. During his illustrious career Maestro Rustichelli composed the music for over 250 motion pictures as well as writing the scores for a number of television projects, he was truly a giant in the world of music for film. He passed away on November 13th 2004 in Lazio Italy aged 87.

 

rustichelli_carlo

SEGUIMI.

These are MMI,s contribution to the sleeve notes on SEGUIMI,(follow me) released on KRONOS RECORDS.

56879

To say that composer Marco Werba’s music for the psychological mystery SEGUIMI is haunting and atmospheric would be something of an understatement. It has about it a presence and a persona that is given greater impact because of the composers use of layers of sounds and a somewhat sparse but at the same time attention grabbing style, the composer fuses electronic instrumentation with ethnic and conventional orchestral performances to create a soundtrack that immediately engaging. It I think is probably one of the Maestro’s most accomplished and innovative works for cinema. It is a score that is rewarding and interesting to listen to, and one that compliments, supports, and enhances the scenarios that are being played out on screen. I would not say that this is a score that is laden with rich or lush sounding themes in fact they are more steamy and sensual, but nevertheless it is a work that will hold one’s attention whether listening to it on compact disc or experiencing it in the cinema when watching the movie. The balance created by the composer is perfect, with subtle and understated woodwind at times leading and on other occasions acting as punctuation or underlining violin passages. The composer also makes effective use of short but simple piano flourishes at certain points within the score, with a sense of solitude and sadness being relayed via a heartrending cello performance. Throughout the score there is a re-occurring five note motif which can be heard in a number of variations, but no matter what instrumentation or synthetics are utilised to convey the theme it remains chilling and apprehensive. The score is filled with musical textures and colours that often just fleetingly hint or introduce and suggest senses and moods, it is  a work that is oozing with an acoustic fertility which purveys sensuality, uneasiness and even discomfort. A masterful creation and one that will delight and enthral connoisseur’s of movie music.

marco_werba

Marco Werba was born in Madrid, Spain on July 27th 1963. He studied piano and harmony in Italy, and composition and film music at the Manes College of Music in New York. Plus, conducting which he studied in France. As well as being a composer he also teaches film music in Italy and gives tuition on how to score films. He was always interested in cinema and as a young child began also to direct movies himself, making super 8 movies which he would track with music by composers such as Williams and Goldsmith. It was after seeing LOGANS RUN and discovering the rich score by Jerry Goldsmith that Werba decided that he would study music and become a film composer. The composers first scoring assignment was ZOO, directed by Cristina Comencini, which featured a 13-year-old, Asia Argento. The composer sent the director a short adagio for strings entitled THE SURVIVORS, which resulted in him being offered the movie, at first the director wanted to score the film with classical music and a handful of original themes, but in the end Werba wrote forty minutes of music for the picture, which was applauded by fans and critics alike.
Since those early days, the composer has written the music for many motion pictures and has established himself as one of Italy’s most original and talented composers of music for film, being nominated for,  and winning numerous awards.

LIVIDE. sleeve notes for the Kronos records release.

 

 

56878

 

The French film industry in the past ten or twelve years has somewhat improved its output in horror movies and there have been several examples that can, I think be deemed as mini classics. Several the more prominent examples have focused upon the guts, gore and gratuitous violence and sadistic aspects of the horror genre, maybe mirroring the Hollywood productions that have been presented to cinema goers in recent years hoping to attract audiences. LIVIDE however, concentrates more upon the traditional jumps and starts of the horror film and it is the atmosphere created by lighting, camera, actors and storyline that make the watching audience uneasy and uncomfortable rather than any full-blown violence or grotesque acts of bloodletting.  Its storyline begins with three young people who decide it might be a good idea to break into an old mansion after they hear that there is a great treasure hidden there, after all what could possibly go wrong, well for starters its Halloween and the house is inhabited by an old woman, who was a ballet teacher and is in a permanent comatose state, but other than that it will be fine. The trio of would be thieves, however, come across a lot more than they had bargained for. As soon as they enter the house a night of uncanny and unsettling events begin to unfold. The movie is a combination of sub genres that we associate with the Horror movie, it is in theory a haunted house movie, filled with all the uncertain dark passages and the creaks and noises that are unexplained etc. There is also a certain aura of the Fantastic mixed into the plot, but again this is certainly not a fantasy film. As I have already stated LIVIDE relies on the atmosphere created by its suitably dusty and eerie sets, the dark and unwelcoming house watching the horrific and frightening events as they unfold.  Released in 2011 and directed by Alexandre Bustillo and Julien Maury, who together brought to the screen the disturbing and harrowing horror’s, INSIDE (2007) and AMONG THE LIVING (2014), which were both successful at the box office. Composer Raphael Gesqua has written a wonderfully atmospheric and chilling score for LIVIDE, his music is more than supporting to the scenario unfolding upon the screen, in fact I would say that the score is responsible for making the movie so effective and disconcerting in places.

 

livide-10

It is Gesqua’s music that punctuates and underlines every move that the three intruders make and it also stabs and jumps as they head into a more uncertain and dangerous situation. The composers score is at times like a soundscape of effects that for me became the voice of the house, an ominous and breathy sound being utilised and underlined with dark sounding percussive elements and combined with a sombre and somewhat sinewy sounding violin which is highly effective when combined with a spidery and deliciously fragmented piano. It is a score that at one moment is slightly melancholy and subdued, then in an instant it erupts and screams at you. It is dark and brooding, tinged with a virulent persona and contains an urgency that at times is filled with dread. The combination of the photography, acting, storyline and music is literally startling.

 

136030

I spoke to the composer about his music and also about LIVIDE and other projects.
I think I am correct when I say you began by scoring a great number of video games, how did you begin working on motion pictures and what would you say are the main differences between scoring a feature film, a short film and working on a game?
Videogames led me to film scoring, as the first person from the movie business I met, Julien Maury, had been introduced to me by a common friend who had known my work in the videogames industry since a long time, and had moved from videogames to movies. The difference between videogames and films music is much less now than when I started about 23 years ago. At the time, it had to do with the inherent technical limitations of each machine. For example, just on the PC, it had to deal with on compatible MIDI sound cards. Except that everyone was free to have the sound card of their choice. Thus, it should be considered that the same sequence sounds good for the PC of each player. A real challenge. Moreover, at the consoles, it was again each composition as often as existing consoles, because each had its own sound system, it should be used as a small very limited memory and number of channels synthesizer. This led to these synthetic records that irritated both parents and marveled fortunately their children, and finally, today, these same children pay tribute to the music of yester year games by composing themselves in the synthetic style that became thus a style of its own. Today, there is no technical limit, in composing for videogames, but there still is a difference: whereas in films you just work on a total linear sequence, in videogames you must kind of anticipate all situations where the player can find himself in.
Also, you can work on real-time interactivity, by using, for instance, multi-tracks scores, with add/remove instruments system depending on player situation.20 years ago, on “Fade to Black”, for instance, I was kind of proud being named by some journalists as “one of the first interactive music composer”. However, when you work on cinematic sequences of a videogame, it is the same as in cinema.

 

1002004013002051

You scored LIVIDE in 2011 for Alexandre Bustillo and Julien Maury, how did you become involved with the movie?

I decided to search for young directors making short films, as I thought it would be the best scoring school, instead of already trying to reach “big” feature films directors, which I though wouldn’t work at all. A friend of mine then told me about a guy in videogames business who had gone to movies business, and he also knew and liked my work.  So, we met. And then, he introduced me to a young director making a short comedy-sci-fi horror film. That was my first contact with director Julien Maury (of the “Maury and Bustillo” famous film duo). I did his two short films soundtracks, he seemed to love them, and so, naturally, when he managed to direct his first feature film with Alexandre Bustillo, “Inside” (“A l’intérieur”), in 2006, he offered me to do the soundtrack. That is how it began. Then came “Livid” (“Livide”), “Among the Living” (“Aux Yeux des Vivants”) and “The ABCs of Death 2” (“X” segment) still with the 2 directors. Now we are real friends, which turns it even more fantastic to work with each other.

What size orchestra, ensemble or selection of synthetics did you use for LIVIDE?

No orchestra was used on Livide. Only hard work with computers, with the only great real instrument, the sweet voice of Florence Martin Giovannelli, for the “Soul Sisters – Final Lullaby” ending theme.

Did the directors/writers Bustillo/Maury have any specific ideas or instructions for you regarding the way in which the movie should be scored?

Yes, at the beginning, they asked me to put some “classical melancholy” to their film, as the main musical direction.

How much time were you given to score LIVIDE ?

I think I worked for about 2 months on the film.

What would you say is the purpose of music in film?

Film music is like a second storyteller making the audience feel something else that just what they can see on the screen. If the composer has nothing more to say in a scene than the director, then he should stay away from the scene. Of course, sometimes, music’s purpose is only to reinforce a feeling, especially in action sequences or some scary ones…But I do like better music adding information than only underlining it…and sometimes, silence is better.

What musical education did you receive, and what areas of music did you concentrate upon?

I’m kind of a self-made composer, which means I didn’t have the opportunity to study music in an “official” way. All I learned (and still am learning) comes from what I’ve listened to and “studied” by myself since my childhood. I can say for sure that it is my passion for movies and videogames that led me to turn my attention to music. I remember, as a child, always being listening to synthetic videogames music, sometimes instead of playing the games themselves, and annoying my parents with those “beep” sounds they didn’t understand at all. I even composed some music on 8-bit computers like “Amstrad”, on which there was no musical tools, and so you had to be a real computer programmer, even for composing music. But around 1987, a personal computer called “Commodore Amiga”, opened new horizons to me, as it enabled the perspective of using samples with a different way as synthesizers: the so-called “sound-trackers”. Then I began to involve myself in composing music, at the point that someday, came the emergence of a new period called “demo scene”, where computer geeks started unite their talents to create video clips on computers and spreading them on floppy disks and modems (there was no internet, back then)), each clip involving, mostly, a programmer, a graphic artist, and a composer. I had the chance to be quickly well appreciated by international “scene members”, at the point that I entered directly classified to the first place of what was called “The Euro charts”, a periodic class of best programmers, graphic artists and composers from the demo scene, for which everyone in the world could vote. From this time, I still didn’t plan to make music my full-time job, probably by lack of self-trust. But one day, a very good friend of mine told me “Raphaël, you are talented, and if you don’t try to reach videogames companies, I’ll do it for you! As I can tell you, you WILL be a videogames music composer!” A couple of weeks later, I had a phone call from 2 great videogames companies: “Ocean Software” and “Delphine Software International”. It was amazing, for me, as one of those 2 companies produced games I even used to skip school to play them. So, imagine my feelings, when Paul Cuisset, the company director, called me to work on his future productions. A dream coming true…A few years later, the same friend told me” Now that you’ve done videogames music, I can assure you will compose for feature films!” And he was right too, about that. Many years after, however and to be frank, I must confess I still can’t read a musical score, today, and I’m still working with computers, as I always did.

 

 

tho1xyzhj1